The Tournament

Iceland will stage the second eight-team UEFA European Women’s Under-17 Championship from 22 June to 4 July 2015 as the tournament reverts to its standard summer dates.

From the championship’s inaugural edition in 2007/08 until 2012/13, the tournament concluded with a four-team knockout event at the Colovray Stadium opposite UEFA’s Swiss headquarters in Nyon. For 2013/14 the finals doubled in size and England were awarded that season’s edition, played in late 2013 due to the dates of the 2014 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup, for which it acted as a qualifier.

Now the tournament is back in the summer and in a country which previously held the 2007 UEFA European Women’s U19 Championship and men’s 1997 U18 Championship.

Referees

  • TBA

    Referee

KSÍ staff

  • Klara Bjartmarz

    FA of Iceland

  • Dagur Sveinn Dagbjartsson

    FA of Iceland

  • Guðlaugur Gunnarsson

    FA of Iceland

  • Gunnar Gylfason

    FA of Iceland

  • Hilmar Þór Guðmundsson

    FA of Iceland

  • Jóhann G. Kristinsson

    FA of Iceland

  • Kristinn V. Jóhannsson

    FA of Iceland

  • Magnús Már Jónsson

    FA of Iceland

  • Magnús Stefánsson

    FA of Iceland

  • Margrét Elíasdóttir

    FA of Iceland

  • Ómar Smárason

    FA of Iceland

  • Ragnheiður Elíasdóttir

    FA of Iceland

  • Þorvaldur Ingimundarson

    FA of Iceland

Team Liaison Officers

  • Anna Dóra Ágústsdóttir

    Switzerland

  • Borghildur Sigurðardóttir

    England

  • Halldór Hafsteinsson

    England

  • Ásmundur Vilhelmsson

    Germany

  • Svanhvít Sveinsdóttir

    Germany

  • Hanna Sigríður Sigurðardóttir

    Spain

  • Páll Ármann

    Spain

  • Ingibjörg Jónsdóttir

    Norway

  • Hólmfríður Magnúsdóttir

    Norway

  • Grétar Skúlason

    France

  • Sigríður Arndís Jóhannsdóttir

    Ireland

Local Organising Committee

  • Guðrún Inga Sívertsen

    Chairman

  • Jakob Skúlason

    Member of board

  • Lúðvík S. Georgsson

    Member of board

  • Ragnhildur Skúladóttir

    Member of board

  • Þórarinn Gunnarsson

    Member of board

Host country

Reykjavík 

The buzzing capital of Iceland is Reykjavik (literally “Smoky Bay”). The small inlet where the city has risen was first named in 874 AD by Iceland’s first settler, Ingólfur Arnarson. He cast his high-seat pillars overboard for the pagan gods to wash ashore at the place where they wished him to make his home. He found his pillars in Reykjavík, and arrived at the name after seeing steam arising from geothermal springs in the area. Reykjavík and the surrounding area is home to about 118.000 people, and more than half the population lives in the capital region. The city is located on the south west coast of Iceland.

People

Icelanders are mostly descended from Nordic settlers. Due to the relative geological and cultural isolation of past centuries, remnants of Iceland’s history abound. Iceland uses the old system of patronymics once common throughout Scandinavia. Children are surnamed with their father’s first name followed by a suffix “son” or “dóttir,” (son/ daughter of). The majority of the population thus has relatively similar last names. Due to high standards in health care and a healthy diet, Iceland maintains one of the highest life expectancies in the world. Language Icelandic is the national language directly derived from the Old Norse language spoken throughout much of Northern Europe. Iceland’s relative isolation has protected the original grammatical and vocabulary structure. As a consequence, speakers of Icelandic can still read ancient Norse manuscripts. Although modern, Icelandic has undergone changes of pronunciation and, of course, of vocabulary. English is spoken by the majority of the population, as English is a mandatory school subject from the age of ten.

Culture

Icelanders are largely descended from Nordic and Celtic settlers and still share a strong bond with Scandinavia today. Family is of ultimate importance and traditional family gatherings are a way of life. Children are a priority and Iceland boasts a higher birth rate than any country in the European Union. Pure products and a healthy natural environment have blessed Icelanders with one of the longest life expectancies in the world. As a whole, Icelanders are creative and self-reliant. The level of education in the country is high, and interest in arts and culture is widespread. Like anyone else, Icelanders like to have fun. They work hard and play hard and love sharing their country with visitors. It’s no exaggeration: if you’ve been to Iceland once, you always have friends in Iceland.

Religion

Ninety per cent of the population belongs to the Lutheran Church; about one per cent is Roman Catholic. Although the first settlers were originally Pagan, Iceland converted to Christianity in 1000 AD through a parliamentary decision. Some remnants of paganism remain, mostly through symbolism and ceremonies.